Posts Tagged ‘conventional advertising’

The Horse that Drew the Load

October 13, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

The Horse that Drew the Load

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essays About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman A moving van came rolling down the street the other day with a big spirited Percheron in the center and two wretched nags on either side. The Percheron was doing all the work, and it seemed that he would have got along far better in single harness, than he managed with his inferior mates retarding his speed. The advertiser who selects a group of newspapers usually harnesses two lame propositions to every pulling newspaper on his list, and just as the van driver probably dealt out an equal portion of feed to each of his animals, just so many a merchant is paying practically the same rate to a weak daily, that he is allowing the sturdy profitable sheet. Unfortunately the accepted custom of inserting the same advertisement in every paper acts to the distinct disadvantage of the meritorious medium. The advertiser charges the sum total of his expense against the sum total of his returns, and thereby does himself and the best puller an injustice, by crediting the less productive sheets with results that they have not earned. It's the pulling ...

You Must Irrigate Your Neighborhood

October 07, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

You Must Irrigate Your Neighborhood

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essays About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman Half a century ago there were ten million acres of land, within a thousand miles of Chicago, upon which not even a blade of grass would grow. Today upon these very deserts are wonderful orchards and tremendous wheatfields. The soil itself was full of possibilities. What the land needed was water. In time there came farmers who knew that they could not expect the streams to come to them, and so they dug ditches and led the water to their properties from the surrounding rivers and lakes; they tilled the earth with their brains as well as their plows—they became rich through irrigation. Advertising has made thousands of men rich, just because they recognized the possibilities of utilizing the newspapers to bring streams of buyers into neighborhoods that could be made busy locations by irrigation—by drawing people from other sections. The successful retailer is the man who keeps the stream of purchasers coming his way. It isn't the spot itself that makes the store pay—it's the man who makes the spot pay. Centers of trade are not selected by the public—they ...

If It Fits You, Wear this Cap

October 05, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

If It Fits You, Wear this Cap

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essays About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman Advertising isn't a crucible with which lazy, bigoted and incapable merchants can turn incompetency into success—but one into which brains and tenacity and courage can be poured and changed into dollars. It is only a short cut across the fields—not a moving platform. You can't “get there” without “going some.” It's a game in which the worker—not the shirker—gets rich. By its measurement every man stands for what he is and for what he does, not for what he was and what he did. Every day in the advertising world is another day and has to be taken care of with the same energy as its yesterday. The quitter can't survive where the plugger has the ghost of a chance. Advertising doesn't take the place of business talent or business management. It simply tells what a business is and how it is managed. The snob whose father created and who is content to live on what was handed to him, can't stand up against the man who knows he must build for himself. What makes you think that you are entitled to prosper as well ...

How Alexander Untied the Knot

October 03, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

How Alexander Untied the Knot

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essays About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman Alexander the Great was being shown the Gordian Knot. “It can't be untied,” they told him; “every man who tried to do so, failed.” But Alexander was not discouraged because the rest had flunked. He simply realized that he would have to go at it in a different way. And instead of wasting time with his fingers, he drew his sword and slashed it apart. Every day a great business general is shown some knot which has proven too much for his competitors, and he succeeds, because he finds a way to cut it. The fumbler has no show so long as there is a brother merchant who doesn't waste time trying to accomplish the impossible—who takes lessons from the failures about him and avoids the methods which were their downfall. The knottiest problems in trade are: 1—The problem of location. 2—The problem of getting the crowds. 3—The problem of keeping the crowds. 4—The problem of minimizing fixed expenses. 5—The problem of creating a valuable good will. None of these knots is going to be untied by fumbling fingers. They are too complicated. They're all inextricably involved—so twisted ...

The Pass of Thermopylae

September 30, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

The Pass of Thermopylae

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essays About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman Xerxes once led a million soldiers out of Persia in an effort to capture Greece, but his invasion failed utterly, because a Spartan captain had entrenched a hundred men in a narrow mountain pass, which controlled the road into Lacedaemon. The man who was first on the ground had the advantage. Advertising is full of opportunities for men who are first on the ground. There are hundreds of advertising passes waiting for some one to occupy them. The first man who realizes that his line will be helped by publicity, has a tremendous opportunity. He can gain an advantage over his competitors that they can never possess. Those who follow him must spend more money to equal his returns. They must not only invest as much, to get as much, but they must as well, spend an extra sum to counteract the influence that he has already established in the community. Whatever men sell, whether it is actual merchandise or brain vibrations, can be more easily sold with the aid of advertising. Not one half of the businesses which should be exploited ...

The Dollar that Can’t be Spent

September 29, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

The Dollar that Can’t be Spent

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essay About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman Every dollar spent in advertising is not only a seed dollar which produces a profit for the merchant, but is actually retained by him even after he has paid it to the publisher. Advertising creates a good will equal to the cost of the publicity. Advertising really costs nothing. While it uses funds it does not use them up. It helps the founder of a business to grow rich and then keeps his business alive after his death. It eliminates the personal equation. It perpetuates confidence in the store and makes it possible for a merchant to withdraw from business without having the profits of the business withdrawn from him. It changes a name to an institution—an institution which will survive its builder. It is really an insurance policy which costs nothing—pays a premium each year instead of calling for one and renders it possible to change the entire personnel of a business without disturbing its prosperity. Advertising renders the business stronger than the man—independent of his presence. It permanentizes systems of merchandising, the track of which is left for others to follow. A business ...

The Man who Retreats before His Defeat

September 23, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

The Man who Retreats before His Defeat

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essay About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman Advertising isn't magic. There is no element of the black art about it. In its best and highest form it is plain talk, sane talk—selling talk. Its results are in proportion to the merit of the subject advertised and the ability with which the advertising is done. There are two great obstacles to advertising profit, and both of them arise from ignorance of the real functions and workings of publicity. The first is to advertise promises which will not be fulfilled,—because all that advertising can do when it accomplishes most, is to influence the reader to investigate your claims. If you promise the earth and deliver the moon, advertising will not pay you. If you bring men and women to your store on pretense and fail to make good, advertising will have harmed you, because it has only drawn attention to the fact that you are to be avoided. It is as unjust to charge advertising with failure under these conditions, as it would be for your neighbor to rob a bank and make you responsible for his misdeed. In brief, advertised dishonesty is ...

The Cellar Hole and the Sewer Hole

September 15, 2011  |   Advertising and Marketing   |     |   0 Comment

The Cellar Hole and the Sewer Hole

Another classic short story about advertising from The Clock that Had no Hands And Nineteen Other Essays About Advertising By Herbert Kaufman A coal cart stopped before an office building in Washington and the driver dismounted, removed the cover from a manhole, ran out his chute, and proceeded to empty the load. An old negro strolled over and stood watching him. Suddenly the black man glanced down and immediately burst into a fit of uncontrollable laughter, which continued for several minutes. The cart driver looked at him in amusement. “Say, Uncle,” he asked, “do you always laugh when you see coal going into a cellar?” The negro sputtered around for a few moments and then holding his hands to his aching sides managed to say, “No, sah, but I jest busts when I sees it goin' down a sewer.” The advertiser who displays lack of judgment in selecting the newspapers which carry his copy often confuses the sewer and the cellar. All the money that is put into newspapers isn't taken out again, by any means. The fact that all dailies possess a certain physical likeness, doesn't necessarily signify a similarity in character, and it's character in a newspaper that brings returns. The ...

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